12 October, 2017

Seminar: Children's and Young Adult Books


to be held on 21 October 2017 in the Auditorium at the Sandton Public Library

This seminar features a number of authors talking about the path to publication, both traditional and independent, about the power of dreams and hard work. It promises to be stimulating, thought-provoking and motivating.

Cost:               Early bird payment by 13 October: R100 SCBWI members, R200 non-members

At the door: R150 SCBWI members, R300 non-members

RSVP:            By 19 October to Jenny at SCBWI.SAGauteng@mweb.co.za

All welcome - members and non-members. This event is for illustrators and writers – aspiring and published.

Tea and coffee will be available but participants are asked to bring their own lunch boxes.

PROGRAMME

09:15       Welcome: A day away from adult concerns to one filled with children’s stories and young adult dreams - Jenny Hatton: writer of numerous textbooks, three children’s picture books published by Jacana Media and a play published by Junkets, editor of children’s fiction and non-fiction, organizer of SCBWI events in Gauteng and general plodder.

09:30       A fairy tale in Joan Rankin style - Joan Rankin: writer and illustrator of more than 100 books published nationally and internationally, awarded the HAUM Daan Retief Publishers Competition for Children’s Book Illustration in 1986, the Katrien Harries Award for Children’s Book Illustration in 1991 and 2009, the Oppenheimer Toy Portfolio Gold Award in 2003, the MER Award in 2011 and the Tienie Holloway Gold Medal for Children's Literature in 2012.

                Traditional publishing                       

10:00       Seeing yourself in the story: Writing a series for young people - Bontle Senne: a literacy advocate and writer of fiction for children and teenagers with two books published by Cover2Cover,  these part of an Afrocentric adventure/fantasy trilogy for 9-12-year-olds called Shadow Chasers, Army of Shadows and Lake of Memories.

10:45       Tea                                                       

11:00       Where to now: What happens after the first book has been published?            - Susie Dinneen, writer, thinker, doodler, picture lover, general nerd, reader and copy editor whose first book, Nombulelo and the Moth, was published by Puffin Books.

                Traditional and self-publishing      

11:45   Going hybrid: traditional publishing versus publishing my own books - Joanne Macgregor, a bird of many feathers, is a prolific writer of children’s and young adult books amongst which are two children’s picture books about Jemima Jones, three eco-warrior YA books published by Protea Books, six YA self-published books and even a book for adults, all this between counseling work as a psychologist.

12:30       Lunch                                                  

13:15       Don’t preach! Writing about serious topics for teens - Fiona Snykers, author of the Trinity series of novels, the Sisterz series of mobile phone novels commissioned by the Shuttleworth Foundation and  Now Following You, a thriller published by Modjaji Books, nominated for the Sunday Times Fiction Prize; also a reviewer of books for the Times and the Sunday Times

14:00       The marketing of self-published books: a tough exercise for a shy person - Damaria Senne, an activist, journalist, writer, communications specialist, blogger and publisher had her first story, The Doll That Grew, published in 1993 by Macmillan Boleswa but has also written educational materials, brochures, pamphlets, newsletter copy, website and blog content and established Storypot where she began to publish some of her content online independently and later established Damaria Senne Media.
14:45   Thanks

28 March, 2017

Exhibition: Adelle van Zyl

Exhibition: Adelle van Zyl

Venue: UNISA Art Gallery (Kgorong Building, Ground Floor, UNISA, Preller St, Pretoria)
Date:  Tuesday 4 April 2017 (Exhibition from 1 - 21 April 2017)
Time:  10:30
Cost:  Lunch at own cost at Cafe 41 in Groenkloof
RSVP: To Jenny at SCBWI.SA.Gauteng@mweb.co.za

About the event: Adelle van Zyl is an illustrator of children’s books and graphic designer. She will walk us through the exhibition and talk about her artworks on display.

  Adelle van Zyl posted in S(H)ELVES .       Adelle van Zyl March 16 at 5:27am   Press Release for S(H)ELVES “For what you really collect is always yourself” (Baudrillard 1996) In her Masters Degree exhibition titled S(H)ELVES, Adelle van Zyl engages with the phenomena of collecting and hoarding on a personal level. Through intra- and interpersonal relationships with her father, her husband, and herself, she explores how people surround themselves with objects that become a reflection of their owner. Through the medium of installation the artist invites the viewer to immerse themselves in the density of these persons’ living spaces, offering a glimpse into their complex and idiosyncratic personas. The exhibition aims to offer a sympathetic view of anyone who was ever faced with a mass of objects that are, on the surface, meaningless, but really form the fabric of their lives. In The Collector, the artist created an almost exact replica of her father’s study. Through the sourcing of near identical items she constructs a one-to-one scale map. The main theme that is deliberated through this installation are the concepts of progression and regression. The completion of the collection becomes an important factor in this work, as Van Zyl’s father is in the process of completing his collection, in order to bequeath it to his grandchildren. The Quiet Man is based on the artist’s husband and their struggle to communicate within their relationship. The installation is an exaggeration of his assemblage of “stuff”: pc components and cables are applied as media and as metaphor for broken communication. Through this installation the artist considers how their combined hobby – birding - can be seen as a way of collecting but also as a channel for communication. The Pockets Of My Jeans consists of a very personal and meaningful collection of yellow items from the artist’s past, stacked and layered in a column stretching from floor to ceiling. Within this work the artist explores the idea that meaning is created through our collections of objects – the basis of her search for a spirituality that exists outside of formal religion.   Like Comment    
   
   
   
   

Press Release for S(H)ELVES

“For what you really collect is always yourself” (Baudrillard 1996)

In her Masters Degree exhibition titled S(H)ELVES, Adelle van Zyl engages with the phenomena of collecting and hoarding on a personal level. Through intra- and interpersonal relationships with her father, her husband, and herself, she explores how people surround themselves with objects that become a reflection of their owner. Through the medium of installation the artist invites the viewer to immerse themselves in the density of these persons’ living spaces, offering a glimpse into their complex and idiosyncratic personas. The exhibition aims to offer a sympathetic view of anyone who was ever faced with a mass of objects that are, on the surface, meaningless, but really form the fabric of their lives.

In The Collector, the artist created an almost exact replica of her father’s study. Through the sourcing of near identical items she constructs a one-to-one scale map. The main theme that is deliberated through this installation are the concepts of progression and regression. The completion of the collection becomes an important factor in this work, as Van Zyl’s father is in the process of completing his collection, in order to bequeath it to his grandchildren.

The Quiet Man is based on the artist’s husband and their struggle to communicate within their relationship. The installation is an exaggeration of his assemblage of “stuff”: pc components and cables are applied as media and as metaphor for broken communication. Through this installation the artist considers how their combined hobby – birding - can be seen as a way of collecting but also as a channel for communication.

The Pockets Of My Jeans consists of a very personal and meaningful collection of yellow items from the artist’s past, stacked and layered in a column stretching from floor to ceiling. Within this work the artist explores the idea that meaning is created through our collections of objects – the basis of her search for a spirituality that exists outside of formal religion.

   

After viewing the exhibition, we will have lunch at a restaurant nearby. Please indicate in your response, whether you would like to join us for lunch.

This event is for illustrators and writers.All welcome.

South Africa's Children Book Fair


Jozi Book Fair 2017


Illustration Competition


27 February, 2017

Writing and illustrating workshop: Create the setting for your story

Writing and illustrating workshop: Create the setting for your story

Venue:  Johannesburg (address to be sent to respondents)
Date: Tuesday 7 March 2017
Time:    10:00 – 15.00
Cost:  R50 SCBWI members, R100 non-members
RSVP: To Jenny at SCBWI.SA.Gauteng@mweb.co.za

About the event:
Donna Wyckoff-Wheeler, writing teacher, will facilitate the workshop on setting. Using movement to create setting – inspiration from the previous meeting. Elements of setting: physical and social geography, mood, season, ambiance, time (macro and micro aspects), people, objects, technology, lighting, relationships  etc.

About the facilitator:
Dr Donna Wyckoff-Wheeler, who offers courses in writing, is an alumnus of the Ohio State University, where she specialised in Applied English, folklore and narrative studies.

This event is for illustrators and writers.

Pre-Workshop Task – Bring to Workshop.
Use some aspect of “motion” to create a fragment of “setting” for a book entitled: The A-frame House on Baker Street.
Writers:  500 word outside limit, less is fine. Do not describe the house directly, although you may include mention of the house if you like (but this is not essential). The setting you create needs to use some concept of motion to support some aspect of the story at this particular point in the narrative – context, character, or plot. Remember, each of these elements involves multiple aspects of contextual details. Yes, I’m being vague just to allow you to play with the concepts. Work toward any genre (including poetry) and any target age. You don’t need to know the whole story at this point.
Illustrators: One art work (any medium or style, rough or finished) that might appear at some point in a book entitled: The A-frame House on Baker Street. Incorporate some idea of motion into the illustration. As you don’t know the “story” at this point, you can image any genre, length or age group you like. 

05 November, 2016

Unlock your creativity

We had a fantastic workshop with Yvette de Beer. The pictures tell the story.

The workshop was held in Yvette's lovely home on Witbank Dam where she has a beautiful work room flooded with natural light.

We began by painting backing board. Then we were asked to draw characters based on random pieces of driftwood and other natural items.

We were asked to juxtapose two characters. We placed these on the backing boards. As can be seen, many different approaches were taken.

What a fabulous way to unleash creativity, free the mind and be inspired! Thanks Yvette.















31 October, 2016

Jozi Book Fair

The Jozi Book Fair was held from 1-4 September at the Wits Science Stadium, a lovely open and sunny venue surrounded by tutorial rooms. The theme  was “Youth Rising” and young people were in evidence everywhere, singing, dancing, acting and talking about books and reading. 

Young people were invited to send short stories  in to a school competition. Ten of these were selected by Jenny Hatton, Mohale Mashigo and Joan Rankin for publication and the book was launched at the fair.

SCBWI had a stall at the Jozi Book Fair. 

SCBWI members were invited to display their work and assist at the stall. This was all organised by  Matina Genkova-Mpofu.

Joan Rankin sat at a nearby table and helped young people to be creative. Many went away with their own little books which they had illustrated.

Thursday and Friday’s programme for school children was followed by workshops for the general public on Saturday and Sunday. These included ones for aspiring and established  writers and illustrators of children’s books such as the one offered by Joan Rankin and Jenny Hatton: Stealing Ideas – learning from the experts. See the website www.jozibookfair.org.za  

Alan Durant, author of over 100 books for children and young adults, was a special visitor to the fair and his workshop on picture books was a highlight for many.

20 July, 2016

The World has gone Colour Cray-Cray

See an interesting article about Marleen Visser and colouring in.


Reverting back to childhood through colouring-in.
What’s the deal with adult colouring-in Books? http://bigcitylife.co.za/the-world-has-gone-colur-cray-cray/

Presentation by two authors: Edyth Bulbring and Susie Dineen

Venue:  Sandton Public Library
Date: 27 July 2016
Time: 10:00
Cost: R25 SCBWI members, R50 non-members
RSVP: To Jenny at SCBWI.SA.Gauteng@mweb.co.za

Programme
10:00 Tea
10:15 Edyth Bulbring
11:15 Susie Dineen
12:30 Lunch in the square at own cost

About the presenters
 Edyth Bulbring has published the following books:
Cornelia Button and the Globe of Gamagion. Jacana. 2008. 
Melly, Mrs Ho and Me.
Penguin. 2010.  Published in the UK by Hot Key Publishers as A Month with April-May in 2013.
Melly, Fatty and Me.
Penguin. 2011. - Awarded the 2012 Percy Fitzpatrick prize for youth literature. Published in the UK by Hot Key Publishers as 100 Days of April-May in 2013.
Pops and the Nearly Dead. Penguin. 2010.
The Club. Jonathan Ball. 2008.
The Mark. Tafelberg. 2014.
The Summer of Toffie and Grummer. OUP. 2008. Published in the UK by Hot Key Publishers as I Heart Beat in 2014.

The focus of the presentation will be on Edyth’s new book, Snitch, which was published in May this year. It’s a book about mothers and sons, bully boys and tough girls, falling in love for the first time, and of course, a dog with anger issues.

Susie Dineen has had her very first picture book for children published by Struik this year. It is called Nombulelo and the Moth and is illustrated by Maja Sereda. SCBWI is thrilled to share her excitement and joy at seeing her idea turned into a story. We’re looking forward to a reading.

There’ll also be lots of time for questions and informal discussion.

All welcome - members and non-members. This event is for illustrators and writers.

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01 June, 2016

Workshop: Stealing ideas - learning from the experts

Venue: Johannesburg (address to be sent to respondents)
Date: 7 June 2016
Time: 10:00 - 15:00
Cost: R100 SCBWI members, R200 non-members
RSVP: To Jenny at SCBWI.SA.Gauteng@mweb.co.za

About the workshop
Joan Rankin will share ideas on learning from artists and then Jenny Hatton will discuss techniques used by well-known writers of picture books. This will be followed by a practical exercise.

All welcome - members and non-members. This event is for illustrators and writers.


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18 May, 2016

The problem with self-publishing

Valuable article with link from Colleen Higgs about the difference between self-publishing and being published by a publisher - by Arthur Attwell
medium.com
What self-publishers lack is not skill, but the relationship between an author and a publisher

04 May, 2016

Photoshop workshop

Adelle van Zyl, illustrator and graphic designer, showed participants techniques and steps she used to create illustrations for Rympies vir Pikkies & Peuters.
The demonstration covered the following:
Scanning line drawings, ensuring correct quality and colour settings
Removing background, enhancing colour and touching up of line drawing using Photoshop - working with a stylus and tablet
Creating textured backgrounds in Photoshop - working with layers and the clone tool
Adding shading, highlights and detail in Photoshop - working with transparency and brushes.

Photo by Teresa Truda

02 May, 2016

Characterisation through puppetry



Joan Rankin, 

well-known and award-winning illustrator and writer of children's books 
presented a workshop on using puppets to develop characters.

Participants were given a set of questions to ask of their characters. 
The answers were discussed.


Great fun was had by all. 
Photos by Teresa Truda

08 March, 2016

Hans Christian Anderson Award

See the wonderful film on the Hans Christian Andersen Award for 2016 at:  https://youtu.be/d2L6mrEc6eM

08 January, 2016

Exclusive Books IBBY SA Award for the best picture book of 2013 and 2014

Fiona Moodie’s Noko and the Kool Kats (Tafelberg) has been announced as the winner of the 5th Exclusive Books IBBY SA award -  for the best picture book of the past two years (2013 and 2014).   In the words of the jury, “It’s a witty and engaging tale, seamlessly accompanied by illustrations that are deceptively simple, their spontaneity underpinned by a keen eye and fine sensibility. The likeable and down-to earth character of Noko the porcupine is hilariously offset by the spoilt and egotistical Kool Kats. The generous scale of the book contributes a great deal to its appeal.  This is a notable contribution to picture books that celebrate our home in Africa.”
 The two runners-up are also wonderful examples of high quality South African children’s literature:
  • Wendy Hartmann and Joan Rankin’s   Sisi goes to school and other stories (H&R 2013) is described by the jury as “ a delightful compilation of story and rhyme, filled with warmth, love and friendship.  Joan Rankin’s watercolour illustrations are astonishingly beautiful and create the right atmosphere of gentleness and charm.”
  • According to the jury, in Dianne Hofmeyr and Piet Grobler’s  The name of the tree is Bojabi (H&R, 2013), “Piet Grobler creates in his illustrations a humorous but real world inhabited by the animals of Africa. The story has a repetitive element which makes it wonderfully suitable for storytelling, and children will enjoy the playful names and rhymes.”
Warm congratulations and thanks to the books' publishing teams.  They are books to be proud of.  
IBBY South Africa is grateful to Exclusive Books for generously partnering us in this award - and for hosting yesterday's celebratory brunch.    

Genevieve Hart - IBBY SA Chairperson 

01 November, 2015

Katrine Harries Award for Children's Book Illustrations: 2008-2014 (from IBBY SA's Spring Newsletter 2015)

  The Katrine Harries Award for Children’s Book Illustrations: 2008-2014

                                           

The award winners are: Joan Rankin for Just Sisi (Human & Rousseau) for the period 2008 – 2009; Maja Sereda for Haasmoles (LAPA) for the period 2010 – 2011; and Johan Strauss for In die Land van Pamperlang (Human & Rousseau) for the period 2012 – 2013.

The Katrine Harries award is the oldest award in South Africa for illustrations in children’s picture books and the only one that awards the illustrations in children’s books as an art form. Only illustrators based in South Africa are considered for the award.

The illustrations in Just Sisi by Joan Rankin, the grande dame of South African children’s book illustrations, were described by the judges as well balanced, creating enough space to draw attention to the subject matter, and giving the reader some breathing space. “Light and airy and absolutely delightful!” She managed to tell a visual story with a high cultural content without mentioning race or colour.

                                
                              Just Sisi - illustrations by Joan Rankin

Maja Sereda’s illustrations were commended for being refreshingly entertaining. Although there is a lot of activity and movement in each illustration, it never becomes forced and overbearing. With little detail an array of emotions is evoked and young readers will identify effortlessly with the characters. “Great fun!”

Johann Strauss’s illustrations are meticulously thought through and splendidly executed – each a masterpiece in its own right. His style is unique and fresh. His interpretation of elements of nature ensures a dreamlike quality. He has mastered his medium, making In die Land van Pamperlang “a fairytale brought to life”.

                                       
                      Johan Strauss for In die Land van Pamperlang

The Katrine Harries award, a nine carat gold medal, was created in the early 1960s by the SA Library Association and later taken over by the South African Institute for Library and Information Science (SAILIS). When SAILIS was disbanded, the new organisation, LIASA, was not interested in continuing with awards. Nicol Stassen, the owner of Protea Boekhuis, has sponsored the award from 1997. It was awarded the last time at the centenary of the University of Pretoria in 2008. A lack of resources and interest caused another six years to go by, but collaboration between the Department of Information Science at Unisa and IBBY SA North, has now again made it possible to continue with the award.

The judges were:

Prof. Molly Brown is the Head of the English Department at the University of Pretoria. Children's Literature is one of her key research interests and her PhD was on young adult fantasy. She has published in Journals such as The Lion and the Unicorn, Mousaion and Papers: Explorations into Children's Literature. Prof. Brown also runs an Honours course in Children's Literature and has established The Child and the Story as a Faculty Research Theme at the University of Pretoria.

       
                                         Maja Sereda for Haasmoles

Katinka Joubert is a graphic designer and illustrator at Onesanesoul and mother of a two year old boy. She helps out at various orphanages in Hammanskraal from where her passion for upliftment grew. Her dream is to cultivate art awareness amongst underprivileged children.

Thea Bester-Swanepoel also a graphic designer, specializes in book- and publishing design. She is currently employed by Unisa Press. As mother of two small boys, she is passionate about children’s books and dreams about establishing her own project on children’s book illustrations.

For more information contact
Prof Thomas van der Walt

 Thomas van Der Walt and Maritha Snyman must be congratulated on their work in reviving the Katrine Harries award – Genevieve Hart

IBBY Honour List of Books 2015-16

IBBY SA, the South African national section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), an international body with 74 national sections around the world, selected the following books to be presented at the IBBY World Congress in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2016 as having made a special contribution to recent South African literature for children and young people:


Author: Afrikaans 
Fanie Viljoen: Uit (LAPA Uitgewers, Pretoria) – for making it easy for all teenagers to experience and emphathise with a young man’s growing realisation of his sexual orientation

Author: English 
Charmaine Kendal: Miscast (Junkets Publisher, Cape Town) – for its sensitive exploration of the inner journey of a trans boy; probably the first South African teen novel about transgender

Translator: into Afrikaans
Kobus Geldenhuys:  Hoe om jou draak te tem (Protea Boekhuis, Stellenbosch) translated from Cressida Cowell’s How to Train Your Dragon – for capturing the spirit and sense of the fantastical in his translation

Translator: into isiXhosa 
Sindiwe Magona: Umculo neentsomi zase-Afrika (University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, Pietermaritzburg) translated from Gcina Mhlophe’s Stories of Africa – for transmitting the magic of the original folktales so faithfully

Translator: into seSotho 
Selloane Khosi: Baile le Moketa (Jacana Media, Johannesburg), translated from Gerard Sekoto’s Shorty and Billy Boy– for a clear and lively version of the 1973 story of Sekoto’s, only recently published for the first time

Illustrator: 

Dale Blankenaar: Olinosters op die dak / Rhinocephants on the roof by Marita van der Vyver (NB Publishers, Cape Town) – for his rendering of the eerily atmospheric world of the writing           

05 October, 2015

SCBWI Retreat with Alan Durant

If you are thinking about joining SCBWI or have allowed your membership to lapse, go to www.scbwi.org to sign up or activate your membership right away. This retreat is one of the wonderful benefits that membership of SCBWI offers.

Dates for retreat in the Gauteng: 6 - 8 Nov; the Retreat starts at 17:00 on Friday and goes through to 14:00 on Sunday (Option to stay over on Sunday night at extra cost)

Amazing value at R3 000 each.

Retreat Venue: Isilwane Bush Farm, see www.sleeping-out.co.za/md/Isilwane-Bush-Camp/27668 Physical Address: Unit 20, Pride of Africa, Dinokeng, Gauteng, Close to Pretoria and Johannesburg

 

Cost: R3 000 per person. This includes food, accommodation and all fees.

What you must do: Book your spot right away - but no later than 7 October 2015.
Pay a deposit of R1 500 by 15 October and the rest by 30 October (or pay R2 700 by 15 October and save R300)
Book for Gauteng retreat: Jenny at
SCBWI.SA.Gauteng@mweb.co.za

 

Critiques/Reviews by ALAN DURANT

IN GAUTENG
Date: 10 November – individual times to be confirmed

Request for a review: to Jenny at SCBWI.SA.Gauteng@mweb.co.za


WHAT THE RETREAT WILL COVER


Note: You can send in the questions you would like answered during the retreat - we will make sure these are included.


The broad thrust will be to give you a sense of what you need to do in order to write a good story and, if you have already written your book, how to improve your manuscript.


The practical application of the presentations in the mornings will be workshopped in the afternoons

 

The presentations / workshops will include:


How to

·         develop your creativity

  • find a story
  • create a credible setting
  • develop and refine a plot
  • develop your writing craft
  • develop/ shape the characters
  • take account of the other elements in a compelling children’s book
  • edit and redraft your manuscript to refine your use of language and get your manuscript ready to be submitted

Practical tips

·         the commercial possibilities of your manuscript

  • how to approach publishers – submission criteria and etiquette

Evening Group sessions

·         how to brainstorm solutions

·         develop your skills as a creator of children’s books

  • stimulate and support your colleagues

Who is Alan Durant?

 

In a nutshell, he is the author of a range of books from picture books such as Burger Boy to top-end teenage thrillers. He also writes prize-winning poetry.


He is married to Jinny, a reception year teacher, and has three children, Amy, Kit and Josie, otherwise known as his ‘guinea pigs’ He has been a National Reading Campaign Reading Champion and is a frequent visitor to schools, libraries and festivals around the UK and abroad where he gives talks and readings and runs writing workshops. He is a member of NAWE and The Society of Authors.

 

Alan’s first book, the young adult novel Hamlet, Bananas and all that Jazz, was published in 1991. Since then, he has written more than 80 stories. He writes for children of all ages – from pre-school to teenage – and in a variety of styles. He has written picture books, first readers, and series such as Creepe Hall, Leggs United and Bad Boyz and thrillers for older readers.


His work was featured in the BBC series English Express, which won a Children's Bafta Award, as did Bookaboo (Series 2) in which his picture book Burger Boy was broadcast. That episode also won a British Animation Award. He appeared too in two programmes in the award-winning Let's Write A Story series.

 

Alan’s Books: www.alandurant.co.uk

 

Awards:

2007: Portsmouth Children's Picture Book Award for Burger Boy, Stockport Children's Book Award for Football Fever
2008: The Royal Mail Award for Scottish Children's Books for Billy Monster's Daymare
2009: Portsmouth Children's Book Award for Billy Monster’s Daymare


BAFTA and British Animation Award.
Kate Greenaway Medal for Always and forever
Nottingham Children’s Book Award (Gameboy)
Shortlisted for Red House Children’s Book Award (Dear Tooth Fairy)
Kingston Borough/Waterstone's Poetry Prize on two occasions.


“Writing for children can be very rewarding but it certainly isn't easy – and getting published is harder still. Having the opportunity to talk with other writers and get the advice of experienced published authors is always helpful – it certainly helped me when I began my career as a children's book author twenty years ago.

http://www2.le.ac.uk/offices/english-association/sigs/childrens-literature/authors/durant https://www.newwritingsouth.com/?location_id=237